MYTHBUSTER MONDAY

"Full coverage" will get me a new car if I crash.

Your auto repair shop may thank you for having collision and comprehensive coverage, because they'll get paid by your insurer for fixing your car. But however you define "full" coverage, it won't equate to you getting a new car after you crash.

Insurance is meant to put you back to where you were, not improve upon it, so you won't be getting a better car than you had.

If your car insurance agent tells you that you have "full coverage," ask what that entails. It could include liability, property damage and rental reimbursement, says Shane Fischer, an attorney in Winter Park, Fla.

"Unfortunately, most people who claim to have 'full coverage' are people of modest incomes who buy the cheapest policy their state legally allows," he says. "This can leave them without uninsured motorist coverage if they're a victim of a hit and run, without a rental car if theirs is damaged in a crash or personally responsible for thousands in medical bills if they don't have enough liability coverage.

"Full coverage isn't an insurance term agents use, says Adam Lyons, CEO of The Zebra, a digital auto insurance agency. Collision insurance covers damage to your vehicle in an accident. Comprehensive covers non-accident damage, such as from theft and fire. If you want medical coverage and other protections, you'll have to spell that out for your agent, Lyons says.

To request a personal or commercial automobile quote, click here.

Source:

Daily Finance

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